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Ka-i-gimasu by GenreChowderStudios Ka-i-gimasu by GenreChowderStudios
Ka-i-gimasu

Ka-i-gimasu is, in Ao Lai culture, the child spirit of fire attacks and fire set deliberately with dark intentions. He is able to cause fire and manipulate the fires of other spirits, which is usually done to cause harm. Ka-i-gimasu is believed to be the second, and illegitimate, son of A’mechukohontsu, the evil female fire spirit. He has two siblings, older brother E-hige-i-masu, child spirit of natural and benign fires, and younger sister Ka-i-jemasu, child spirit of accidental fire. Almost universally said to male, Ka-i-gimasu’s name means “spiteful fire.”

Ka-i-gimasu is, like his older brother, believed to have a human father from Ao Lai, though he and his younger sister share a different father from E-hige-i-masu. The spiteful child fire is recorded to have met his father and learned evil ways from him. While Ka-i-gimasu was still very young, A’mechukohontsu is said to have enlisted her youngest children’s aid in killing their father. Unlike with her first child, A’mechukohontsu felt somewhat more connected with her second and third children and brought them up to Otherworld with her. Huang Mu granted the two younger children permission to remain with their mother if they monitored the more dangerous fires caused by humans that occurred in Ao Lai. However, as Ka-i-gimasu often neglects his duties, Huang Mu frequently punishes him with various forms of physical penalties or by sending him down to Ao Lai to be chased by Chu’e, the beast totem of fear.

A child spirit of fire, Ka-i-gimasu has the power to control and produce fire as well as be immune to it, but he also gains power from the burning of things, especially of living things. As previously mentioned, Ka-i-gimasu has a habit of neglecting his duties or arriving too late to attend to them sufficiently. His place is to monitor the fire attacks and flame-based warfare on Ao Lai, and he is to “tend” to them as needed, though the Ao Liese people have various definitions for what he does to “tend” to them. Ka-i-gimasu is said to spend most of his time away from his “house” in the clouds of Otherworld. It is believed, however, that he derives far too much enjoyment from watching fire attacks and arrives at the scene when things have quieted down; then, he is said to play in the smoldering remains of whatever was burnt until all the embers have died down. It is said that he’ll gladly restart the fire at the slightest provocation. Alleged “sightings” claim he has been seen in the midst of fire attacks, gleefully setting fire to everything nearby. More modern scholars subscribe to the belief that he may exist in some form inside of those who carry out cruel fire attacks. This belief is not yet widely accepted by Ao Lai’s most trusted scholars, but it is gaining popularity in the younger generations of Ao Lai.

Ka-i-gimasu is almost universally believed to have a single male form, though different artists interpret him differently, i.e. various hairstyles, various heights, etc. The most common iteration of this child spirit portrays him as a very thin boy with orange skin, a tuft of black hair that reflects orange, a high cheek-boned face, and pale red eyes. He is a yi’e’non, or one of “those without vision or direction.” Because of this, he is portrayed with blank eyes. When portrayed by artists of Ao Lai, he is very often shown with an exaggeratedly devious expression. It is believed that though A’mechukohontsu, his mother, attends to his and his sister’s needs far more than E-hige-i-masu’s, she neglects to clothe all three of her children; artists of Ao Lai portray Ka-i-gimasu as nude. In areas displaying non-fine art, he is shown with a degree more modest. Here he is shown with the pants of a black jinbei and a grey obi. Because of certain aspects of his personality, Ka-i-gimasu is sometimes shown to have abnormally long, somewhat tentacle-like arms. His age changes from portrayal to portrayal, though he usually appears to be 12 or younger. In images displaying both E-hige-i-masu and Ka-i-gimasu, the child spirit of spiteful fire is very typically portrayed as younger than the former. Because of certain aspects of his personality, he may be portrayed as an adult.

Out of all three of her children, Ka-i-gimasu is the most like his mother, A’mechukohontsu, in that he has a sadistic personality, but unlike his mother, he has a streak of intelligent cunning. According to more modern scholars, he enjoys convincing humans in Ao Lai to set buildings on fire. Nippon traditionalists disagree with this, however. All reputable scholars, however, believe he is gleeful in his cruelty to his siblings, his aunt, Xixekonohotse, and to almost all he comes into contact with. The child spirit is said to be sneaky and to hint at a sort of mockery that, in some interpretations, seems patronizing and, to some extent, coy. When portrayed with a family member, he is often shown with his age in relation to theirs, i.e. he never appears to be close to his mother’s age. However, alone Ka-i-gimasu is very frequently portrayed as an adult, or at least a young man, which capitalizes on other aspects of his personality, chiefly a depraved nature that he inherited from his mother. Regardless of his age, Ka-i-gimasu is generally thought to be very selective of when he chooses to attend to his duties. Modern scholars suspect that he must also be somewhat indifferent to punishment as he repeatedly incurs them due to his lack of working. Nippon traditionalists disagree, saying he cares very much about punishment, but his stubborn, dull-witted nature as a yi’e’non spirit prevents him from improving his situation. Artists often portray Ka-i-gimasu with very exaggerated expressions, particularly those of a deviant. His face is very rarely portrayed as blank. His overall personality in media depictions remains remarkably intact in comparison to other spirits’ portrayal. Very typical of his more popular depictions have an infamous reputation for being “creepy.” In popular culture and literature, Ka-i-gimasu is often a mix of a “mama’s boy” and “evil genius.”

The child spirits of Ao Lai hold a special place in Ao Liese consciousness. Children are crucial keys to the future in Ao Liese culture. For unknown reasons, child spirits with one of more siblings have certain symbols associated with them. Ka-i-gimasu’s symbol is a rounded Harayin “E” character, as the "E" character is associated with negativity.

The child spirit of spiteful fire is a resident of Otherworld. He lives in the clouds with his siblings, his mother, his aunt, and their housemate, Kintonkegatse, the spirit of clouds and storms.

-Taken from Ao Lai Strange Rules/Traditions-
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:iconfreyad-dryden:
Freyad-Dryden Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013
This guy looks like he'd be a hell of a break dancer.

Seriously, though, I do rather like this one.
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:icongenrechowderstudios:
GenreChowderStudios Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
What? :lol: Why?

Thanks much. Personally, I think the facial expression is one of my best; I also like how his portrayals differ from his brother's. What do you like in particular about this one?
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:iconfreyad-dryden:
Freyad-Dryden Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013
Actually, it's that expression. There's just something so comically smug and mischievous about it.
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:icongenrechowderstudios:
GenreChowderStudios Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
Ahh, yeah. I think the look over the shoulder makes it even better.
Reply
:iconfreyad-dryden:
Freyad-Dryden Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2013
Yeah, that does help. There's something about the whole pose and design though that just works really well.
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March 26, 2013
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